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Reading Fair

 

                                                                                                                                              READING FAIR GUIDELINES

                                                                                                                                PRE-KINDERGARTEN - TWELFTH GRADE

                                                                                                                                                       STUDENT GUIDELINES

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Examples of student Reading Fair boards

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READING FAIR GUIDELINES

The purpose of the Reading Fair Guidelines is to provide Reading Fair coordinators, students, and parents with directions for conducting and participating in a reading fair. These guidelines and resources must be used when submitting information for all competitions.
This document includes:

  • ●  alignment to the College-and Career-Ready Standards,

  • ●  guidelines for creating award-winning literary competition projects,

  • ●  and explanation of categories.

    PURPOSE AND MS College-and Career-Readiness Standards CONNECTIONS

    The purpose of the competition is to provide students in grades PreK-12 the opportunity to share their favorite fictional, nonfiction narrative, or informational book through a storyboard or digital media
    display. With the implementation of the Mississippi College-and Career-Readiness Standards (MS CCRS) for English Language Arts, World Languages, Visual Arts, and Early Childhood, an emphasis has been placed on student mastery of the skills and concepts necessary to read complex texts at each grade level, write texts using evidence, and create presentations that demonstrate imagination and effective use of various materials to express ideas. MS CCRS also places value on reading both literary and informational texts. In support of the MS CCRS, the goal of the Mississippi Reading Fair is to enhance and encourage reading at all grade levels and to allow students to collaborate with their peers. As a result of participating in this process, students will experience a deeper enjoyment from reading and develop a lifelong love of reading.

    There are now only TWO levels of competition: Level 1 –School and Level 2 – District. Only first place winners in each division proceed to the next round of competition, which is the final round held at the District level.

READING FAIR CATEGORIES

FAMILY

Literary Fiction Categories

NOTE: Family division projects should portray a book appropriate to the age of the student(s). The student(s) should be very knowledgeable about the book’s story elements and should have an active part in the construction of the display.

INDIVIDUAL

Literary Fiction Categories

NOTE: Division E and F can choose between Storyboard or Digital Media Presentation.INDIVIDUAL

Informational Nonfiction Texts Categories

NOTE: Division H and I can choose between Storyboard or Digital Media Presentation.GROUP

Literary Fiction Categories

NOTE: Only 2 to 3 students in a group. If a group project has students in various grades,
the project should be placed in the division of the oldest student. This does not include class projects. Division K and L can choose between Storyboard Digital Media Presentation.

Grades

Division

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Presentation Type

Grades PreK-K

Division A

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Storyboard

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Grades 1-2

Division B

Storyboard

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Grades

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Division

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Presentation Type

Grade 3

Division C

Storyboard

Grades 4-5

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Division D

Storyboard

Grades 6-8

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Division E

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Storyboard or Digital Media

Grades 9-12

Division F

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Storyboard or Digital Media

Grades

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Division

Presentation Type

Grades 3-5

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Division G

Storyboard

Grades 6-8

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Division H

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Storyboard or Digital Media

Grades 9-12

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Division I

Storyboard or Digital Media

Grades

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Division

Presentation Type

Grades 3-5

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Division J

Storyboard

Grades 6-8

Division K

Storyboard or Digital Media

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Grades 9-12

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Division L

Storyboard or Digital Media

READING FAIR CATEGORIES

  • ●  Students in grades 3-12 have the opportunity to share their favorite nonfiction book. All students deciding to do so are to compete in the Individual Divisions, within their specified grade group (Divisions G-I). All other entries should only represent Literary Fiction books.

    NOTE: Remember the school’s librarian is an excellent resource for determining if the book selected is indeed fictional. BOOKS DO NOT HAVE TO BE ON READING LEVEL. STUDENTS HAVE FREE CHOICE IN SELECTING A BOOK FOR THE READINGFAIR.

  • ●  Group/Family Division projects should portray a book appropriate to the age of the student(s). The student(s) should be very knowledgeable about the book’s story elements and should have an active part in the construction of the display. Family and Group Divisions will be judged closely on whether the project shows work appropriate for the age level of the student.

    NOTE: Each student is limited to participating in only one project. Each Group Division project must have 2 to 3 students. If a group project has students in various grades, the project should be placed in the division of the oldest student. The projects should reflect the creative and originality of the students in the group.

  • ●  English Language Learners can create bilingual presentations to represent their native language as well as English. Each presentation element must be translated into English for judging. Elements not translated will have points deducted.

    STORYBOARD PROJECTS

    Size

● A standard tri-fold project board that unfolds to be approximately 36” H x 48” W.

NOTE: Boards that do not meet the size requirements will be disqualified, even if they proceed to the DISTRICT final level competition.

Display/Safety

  • ●  Use the checklists as a guide for creating the project.

  • ●  Identifying information (name of the
    student(s), category and division, student’s grade level, homeroom teacher’s name, school anddistrict name) should be labeled on the back of the storyboard. If any identifying information is placed on the front of the storyboard, the project will be disqualified.

  • ●  Only students may present the projects during the judging - even for the family projects. If a student needs accommodations, please submit the Students Needing Accommodations Form for additional adult supervision.

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  • ●  Storyboards should be colorful and interesting. Models, shadow boxes, and illustrations that fit in the middle of the display are allowed. The total project should meet the required the width, depth or height of the standing display board (approximately 36” W x 14” D x 36” H of table space). There cannot be items protruding from the back or top of the board.

  • ●  No items should hang over the edge of the table or be placed on the floor. However, students may hold or wear items that coordinate with the project, if desired. Items used for the project are not to be alive, valuable, or dangerous, including dry ice.

  • ●  Items on the project board may be handwritten or typed. Younger students may require assistance in writing, typing, spelling, cutting, etc. This is permissible and part of the learning process. See Divisions A, B, J, K, and L regarding Family and Group Divisions.

    NOTE: Storyboard content should match the age, grade level, and ability of the students presenting the project. Students do not have to bring or display the book during the competition.

  • ●  Students and teachers are encouraged to accompany their projects throughout all levels of competition; however, the student’s presence is not required. All projects will be fairly judged regardless of the student’s attendance.

  • ●  Projects must be able to withstand several levels of competitions to prevent the student from rebuilding the project at each level. The intent of this competition is for the same project to be judged at different levels.

  • ●  Electrical cords are not allowed at any level of competition due to the potential danger they pose in the aisles.

  • ●  No food or drinks can be used with the projects. Empty packages may be used as part of the display or on the display board.

    DIGITAL MEDIA PROJECTS

    In a continued effort to bring technology to the classroom, the Reading Fair will feature digital presentations. Only Divisions E, F, H, I, K, and L can present Digital Media Projects.

  • ●  Students can create digital presentations using PowerPoint, Google Slide, or presentation format of their choice.

  • ●  Students must provide own iPad or laptop computer. Device should be charged and cannot be plugged in during judging.

  • ●  Maximum time limit: 3 minutes.

  • ●  Any materials that are deemed copyrighted - book covers or Internet images must give credit to

    the creator or source.

  • ●  Project is to be written in the student’s own words and information has not be directly copied or plagiarized from any source.

  • ●  Digital Project must contain the same elements as the Storyboard Project.

READING FAIR LEVELS

  • ●  School level Reading Fairsmaybeheld September 3 through November 1.

  • ●  ONLY the 1st place winner of each division will advance to the next and final level which is

    the district level competition.

  • ●  Winners are NOT based on grade levels.

    READING FAIR TIMELINE

    School Reading Fair Dates may fall between: September 3rd through November 1st

    Announcement of District Reading Fair Winners: November 7th at 3:30 p.m. at the Family Resource Center located in Brandon, MS.

LITERARY FICTION

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NOTE: Religious narratives (including retellings or alternate versions) fall into this category.

INFORMATIONAL NONFICTION

The first component of informational nonfiction is genre. Genres of nonfiction can be identified by one single factor: the intent or purpose of the writing. On the other hand, genres of fiction blend together. For instance, a fantasy story can have characteristics of an adventure story, but not all adventure stories are fantasies. Genres of nonfiction are more clearly defined than fiction. They explain the intent of the author or the purpose of the material.

The five main genres of nonfiction are:

  1. Instructional: Describes how something is done or made.

  2. Explanatory: Tells what happened or how something works, with defined reasons.

  3. Report: Tells how things arediscovered.

  4. Discussion: Looks at both sides of an idea and makes a decision.

  5. Opinion/Argument: Decides on a point-of-view and has reasons to support the view.

Students should be aware of the variety and format of the structures of nonfictional text. Some structures or formats of nonfiction can be seen within a variety of text. For example, a speech can be instructional, explanatory, a report, an opinion, or a discussion. On the contrary, a recipe is considered instructional. This is one thing that makes nonfictional text so unique. The structure can take on different tones and formats depending on the author’s intent.

Students may select from the following nonfiction formats to complete literary competition projects:

  • ●  Autobiographies

  • ●  Biographies

  • ●  Book/movie reviews

  • ●  Consumer Reports articles

  • ●  Debates

  • ●  Editorials

  • ●  Essays

● Interviews
● Journals
● Observations● Presentations● Proposals
● Reports
● Speeches

GRAPHIC ORGANIZER EXAMPLES

Graphic Organizer

Text Pattern

Signal Words

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Description

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Description

On, over, beyond, within, like, as, among, descriptive adjectives, figurative language

Reader should expect the writer to tell characteristics.

1-2-3

Established Sequence

Numbers, alphabets, days of the week, months of the year, centuries

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Reader should expect to follow an established and known sequence in gathering information.

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Chronological Sequence

First, second; before, after; then, next; earlier, later, last, finally; again, in addition to; in the beginning/end

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Reader should expect that events will be told in order of the time they happened.

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Comparison and Contrast

While, yet, but, rather, most, either, like, unlike, same as, on the other hand, although, similarly, the opposite of, besides, however

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Reader should expect to learn similarities and differences.

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Cause and Effect

Since, because, thus, so that, if...then, therefore, due to, as a result, this led to, then...so, forthis reason, consequently

Reader should expect to learn the

effect of one entity on another or others; reader should expect to learn why this event takes place.

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Problem and Solution

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All signal words listed for cause and effect; propose, conclude, the solution is, the problem is, research shows, a reason for, the evidence is that

Reader should expect to identify a problem, predict a solution, and be told a solution or solutions; reader expects to know why the solution is viable.

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Question and Answer

Why, what, when, how, why

Reader should expect to consider a question, come up with an answer, and verify the answer.

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Combination

Any and all

Writer uses a combination of patterns within any one text or section of text.

MAGNOLIA RESOURCES

AR BOOK FINDER allows students, teachers, parents, and librarians to search in English or Spanish to find book level or a LexileTM measure, interest level, title, award-winners, state lists, & CCRS Exemplars.

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KIDSREADSincludesthoughtfulbookreviews, compelling features, in-depth author profiles and interviews, and excerpts of new releases.

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FULL TEXT POETRY a list of websites that provide the full text of thousands of poems, as well as poet biographies, audio of poets reading their work, and essays about poetry.

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NOVELIST offers book-finding tools for librarians and students which includes readers' advisory products and content that strengthen the connection between books, readers, and libraries.

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FIND A BOOK

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Step 1:

Visit www.Lexile.com/fab/ms

Enter the student’s Lexile measure

(If Lexile measure is not known, then search for books based on comfort with grade-level reading)

“FindaBook,Mississippi”isaneasywaytoselectbooksbasedonachild’sLexile measure and interests. The free search tool can help build custom lists for readers at all ability levels, and then locate the books at the local public library.

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Step 2:

Have the student pick interest categories

Step 3:

View and refine the search results

(While browsing books, click the “Findin a Library” button next to the book titles to check its availability at local public library.)

Step 4:

Add books to the student’s reading list

(Print or email the student’s custom book list.)

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COPYRIGHT AND PLAGIARISM

COPYRIGHT AND FAIR USE

  • ●  Copyright laws govern the use of copyrighted materials such as book covers and images from the internet.

  • ●  Teachersandstudentsmayusecopyrightmaterialsforeducationalprojectsandlearning activities, but specific Fair Use guidelines must be followed.

  • ●  Photographs or images may be used in its entirety when creating a presentation for educational purposes.

  • ●  Copyrighted images must be displayed with the creator’s name or where the image was copied from.

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EXAMPLE:

PLAGIARISM

● ●

Copying text exactly how it appears in a book or from a website is called plagiarism.

Students should use their own words to complete the following portions of the Literary Competition presentation:

  • ○  Plot Summary

  • ○  Conflict

  • ○  Solution or Resolution

  • ○  Author(s) Study

  • ○  Text Summary

  • ○  Author’s Purpose

  • ○  Topic Study

    Projects can be disqualified at any level if the information is found to be plagiarised.

Image Credit:

kurtisscaletta.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/web.jpg

FICTION GUIDE

STEP 1: CHOOSE YOUR CATEGORY AND DIVISION

Category: Individual Fiction (Divisions C-F)
Division D (Grade 3) Division F (Grades 6-8) Division E (Grades 4-5) Division G (Grades 9-12)

Note: Division E and F can choose between Storyboard or Digital Media Presentation.

Category: Family/Group Fiction (Divisions A, B, J, K, L)
Division A (Pre-Kindergarten - Kindergarten) Division J (Grades 3-5) Division B (Grades 1-2) Division K (Grades 6-8)

Division L (Grades 9-12)

My group members: , , and .

Note: Only 2 to 3 students in a group. If a group project has students in various grades, the project should be placed in the division of the oldest student. This does not include class projects. Division K and L can choose between Storyboard or Digital Media Presentation.

STEP 2: BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

Use the copyright page to identify the bibliographic information.Title: Name of the Book. Make sure the title is underlined or use italics if typing.

Author: The person who wrote the words or text in a book.Publisher: The company that printed and distributed the book.Publication Date: The year the book was published.

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STEP 3: PLOT SUMMARY

Do not retell the story! Project is written in the student’s own words and information has not been directly copied or plagiarized from any source: websites or books. Be sure to include each of the main characters.

  • ●  PK-1: Retell (through writing/ drawing/ dictating the story) (RL.K-1.2)

  • ●  2-3: Recount the story in a written response - this includes the message or lesson of the story (RL.2-3.2)

  • ●  4-12: Summarize the story in a written response - this includes the message or theme of the story (RL.4-12.2)

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STEP 4: MAIN CHARACTERS

Do not list more than three characters. Write a brief description of each character. Use adjectives to describe the characters. Do not tell the story in this step. Characters listed below must be mentioned in the summary.

Name:
Short Description:

Name:
Short Description:

Name:
Short Description:

STEP 5: SETTING

There are 2 parts to a book’s setting. You must include both! Time - When did the story happen? Be specific.

Place - Where did the story take place? If the story takes place in more than one location, choose only the more important place.

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STEP 6: CONFLICT

What is the main conflict? Choose only one problem.

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STEP 7: SOLUTION/RESOLUTION

How is the problem solved?

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STEP 8: AUTHOR’S STUDY - GRADES 9-12 ONLY

Compare the plot lines, characters, and/or theme of the story by different author or the same author.

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STEP 9: DESIGN YOUR PRESENTATION

Congratulations! The hard part is over; now, the fun begins!

  • ●  Use a standard tri-fold storyboard that unfolds to be 36” high x 48” wide. The sides fold in to make the board stand byitself.

  • ●  Be cautious with flashing transition in your digital presentation.

  • ●  To keep the judge from feeling overwhelmed, you should keep the text on each slide short and to the point. Use the 5/5/5 rule: no more than five words per line of text, five lines of text per slide, or five text-heavy slides in arow.

  • ●  Don’t overload your presentation with animations.

  • ●  Carefully type or write the story elements in Steps 2 - 8. Be creative! For example, if your person is

    a football players, you might choose a font like “IMPACT.”

  • ●  Your text should be easy to read and pleasant to look at. Large, simple fonts and theme colors are

    always your best bet.

  • ●  Props add interest but must fit in the middle of the display. No items can protrude from the back or top of the tri-fold board. Props can be battery-operated, but you cannot use electrical outlets and extension cords. Items cannot be alive, valuable, or dangerous.

  • ●  You do not have to display the book, have props, or dress up.

  • ●  If creating a bilingual presentation, remember to translate all required elements into English for judging.

STUDENT READING FAIR STORYBOARD PROJECT CHECKLIST

Literary Fiction | Divisions A-F and J-L

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Student Name

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Book Title

Grade

Division

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Bilingual (circle one) Yes No

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School

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School District

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HR Teacher

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All the following must be present on the project
NOTE: Project is written in the student’s own words and information has not been directly copied or plagiarized from any source: websites of books. Copyrighted materials have creator or source credits listed.

 

Title

 

Author

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Publisher and Publication Date

 

Plot Summary
PK-1: Retell through writing/drawing/dictating the story 2-3: Recount the story in a written response
4-12: Summarize the story in a written response

 

Main Characters

Onlythoseimportanttothestory line

 

Setting

Place and time of story

 

Conflict

The problem in the story

 

Solution or Resolution

How the problem is resolved

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Author(s) Study

Compare the plot lines, characters, and/or theme of the story to another story by a different author or the same author. Grades 9-12

WRITING

● ●

Writing is neat andinviting Writing is easily understood

THOROUGHNESS OF WRITTEN INFORMATION

● Project captures the most important information
● Project capture the concept/point the author made in the

book

INTEREST EVOKED

CREATIVITY

  • ●  Project is original

  • ●  Project demonstrates imagination

  • ●  Unique materials are used to express ideas

    QUALITY OF PROJECT

  • ●  Project follows the guidelines

  • ●  Project is durable and will last through several rounds of

    competition without physical support

    Student Signature

● ● ●

Project demonstrates student’s ability
Student encourages others to read the book
Student attracts others and makes them interested in the work

Date

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Parent Signature

Date

Reading Fair 22

STUDENT READING FAIR DIGITAL MEDIA PROJECT CHECKLIST

Literary Fiction | Divisions E, F, K, L

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Student Name

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Book Title

Grade

Division

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Bilingual (circle one) Yes No

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School

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School District

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HR Teacher

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All the following must be present on the project
NOTE: Project is written in the student’s own words and information has not been directly copied or plagiarized from any source: websites of books. Copyrighted materials have creator or source credits listed.

 

Title

 

Author

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Publisher and Publication Date

 

Plot Summary
PK-1: Retell through writing/drawing/dictating the story 2-3: Recount the story in a written response
4-12: Summarize the story in a written response

 

Main Characters

Onlythoseimportanttothestory line

 

Setting

Place and time of story

 

Conflict

The problem in the story

 

Solution or Resolution

How the problem is resolved

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Author(s) Study

Compare the plot lines, characters, and/or theme of the story to another story by a different author or the same author. Grades 9-12

TEXT

● ●

T ext is readable and neat T ext is easily understood

THOROUGHNESS OF WRITTEN INFORMATION

● Project captures the most important information
● Project capture the concept/point the author made in the

book

INTEREST EVOKED

CREATIVITY

  • ●  Project is original

  • ●  Project demonstrates imagination

  • ●  Unique technology is used to express ideas

    QUALITY OF PROJECT

  • ●  Project follows theguidelines

  • ●  Project demonstrates digital media skill

    Student Signature

● ● ●

Project demonstrates student’s ability
Student encourages others to read the book
Student attracts others and makes them interested in the work

Date

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Parent Signature

Date

Reading Fair 23

NONFICTION GUIDE

STEP 1: CHOOSE YOUR CATEGORY AND DIVISION

Category: Informational Nonfiction Texts (Divisions G-I) Division G (Grades 3-5)
Division H (Grades 6-8)
Division I (Grades 9-12)

Note: Division H and I can choose between Storyboard or Digital Media Presentation.

STEP 2: BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

Use the copyright page to identify the bibliographic information.Title: Name of the Book. Make sure the title is underlined or use italics if typing.

Author: The person who wrote the words or text in a book.Publisher: The company that printed and distributed the book.Publication Date: The year the book was published.

STEP 3: TYPE OF INFORMATIONAL TEXT

Discussion
ReportExplanatoryOpinion/Argument Instructional

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STEP 4: SUMMARY

Summarize what happened in the text. Project is written in the student’s own words and information has not been directly copied or plagiarized from any source: websites or books.

  • ●  3: Recount the main idea and key details the text in a written response (RI.3.2)

  • ●  4-12: Summarize the text in a written response - include the main/central idea in this summary (RI.4-12.2)

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STEP 5: GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

A graphic organizer is a visual display or picture of information. You must include a graphic organizer summarizing the events in the text. Have fun and be creative! Some internet sites that have printable graphic organizers are listedbelow.

  • ●  ReadWriteThink Cube Creator

    www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/cube-creator-30850.html

  • ●  edHelper Graphic Organizers

    edhelper.com/teachers/graphic_organizers.htm

  • ●  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Education Place

    www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer/

  • ●  Education Oasis Graphic Organizers

    www.educationoasis.com/printables/graphic-organizers/

    STEP 6: STUDENT-MADE CONNECTIONS

    Choose one or more of the following ways you feel connected to the text. Text - Self: I can identify with this topic, because...

    Text - Text: The text reminds me of the book... Title of the Book

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Author of the Book because....

STEP 7: AUTHOR’S PURPOSE

Why did the author write the book? To entertain

To persuade

To inform
A combination of the above

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STEP 8: TOPIC STUDY - GRADES 9-12 ONLY

Recommend another text that has similar or opposing/alternate information on the same topic. (CCR.R.9)

STEP 9: DESIGN YOUR PRESENTATION

Congratulations! The hard part is over; now, the fun begins!

  • ●  Use a standard tri-fold storyboard that unfolds to be 36” high x 48” wide. The sides fold in to make the board stand byitself.

  • ●  Be cautious with flashing transition in your digital presentation.

  • ●  To keep the judge from feeling overwhelmed, you should keep the text on each slide short and to the point. Use the 5/5/5 rule: no more than five words per line of text, five lines of text per slide, or five text-heavy slides in arow.

  • ●  Don’t overload your presentation with animations.

  • ●  Carefully type or write the story elements in Steps 2 - 8. Be creative! For example, if your person is a football players, you might choose a font like “IMPACT.”

  • ●  Your text should be easy to read and pleasant to look at. Large, simple fonts and theme colors are always your best bet.

  • ●  Props add interest but must fit in the middle of the display. No items can protrude from the back or top of the tri-fold board. Props can be battery-operated, but you cannot use electrical outlets and extension cords. Items cannot be alive, valuable, or dangerous.

  • ●  You do not have to display the book, have props, or dress up.

  • ●  If creating a bilingual presentation, remember to translate all required elements into English for judging.

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STUDENT READING FAIR STORYBOARD PROJECT CHECKLIST

Informational Nonfiction Text | Divisions G-I

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Student Name

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Book Title

Grade

Division

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Bilingual (circle one) Yes No

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School

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School District

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HR Teacher

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All the following must be present on the project
NOTE: Project is written in the student’s own words and information has not been directly copied or plagiarized from any source: websites of books. Copyrighted materials have creator or source credits listed.

 

Title

 

Author

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Publisher and Publication Date

 

Type of Informational Text

Discussion, Report, Explanatory, Opinion/Argument, Instructional

 

Text Summary

3: Recount the main idea and key details the text in a written response
4-12: Summarize the text in a written response

 

Graphic Organizers

Capture the main/central idea and/or main points important to the text

 

Student Connections

Text-to-self; text-to-text; and/or text-to-world

 

Author’s Purpose

Identify the main purpose of the text (to explain, persuade, describe, entertain, and/or answer a question)

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Topic Study

Recommend another text that has similar or opposing/alternate information on the same topic Grades 9-12

WRITING

● ●

Writing is neat andinviting Writing is easily understood

THOROUGHNESS OF WRITTEN INFORMATION

● Project captures the most important information
● Project capture the concept/point the author made in the

book

INTEREST EVOKED

CREATIVITY

  • ●  Project is original

  • ●  Project demonstrates imagination

  • ●  Unique materials are used to express ideas

    QUALITY OF PROJECT

  • ●  Project follows the guidelines

  • ●  Project is durable and will last through several rounds of

    competition without physical support

    Student Signature

    Parent Signature

● ● ●

Project demonstrates student’s ability
Student encourages others to read the book
Student attracts others and makes them interested in the work

Date

Date

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STUDENT READING FAIR DIGITAL MEDIA PROJECT CHECKLIST

Informational Nonfiction Text | Divisions H and I

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Student Name

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Book Title

Grade

Division

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Bilingual (circle one) Yes No

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School

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School District

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HR Teacher

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All the following must be present on the project
NOTE: Project is written in the student’s own words and information has not been directly copied or plagiarized from any source: websites of books. Copyrighted materials have creator or source credits listed.

 

Title

 

Author

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Publisher and Publication Date

 

Type of Informational Text

Discussion, Report, Explanatory, Opinion/Argument, Instructional

 

Text Summary

3: Recount the main idea and key details the text in a written response
4-12: Summarize the text in a written response

 

Graphic Organizers

Capture the main/central idea and/or main points important to the text

 

Student Connections

Text-to-self; text-to-text; and/or text-to-world

 

Author’s Purpose

Identify the main purpose of the text (to explain, persuade, describe, entertain, and/or answer a question)

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Topic Study

Recommend another text that has similar or opposing/alternate information on the same topic Grades 9-12

TEXT

● ●

T ext is readable and neat T ext is easily understood

THOROUGHNESS OF WRITTEN INFORMATION

● Project captures the most important information
● Project capture the concept/point the author made in the

book

INTEREST EVOKED

CREATIVITY

  • ●  Project is original

  • ●  Project demonstrates imagination

  • ●  Unique technology is used to express ideas

    QUALITY OF PROJECT

  • ●  Project follows theguidelines

  • ●  Project demonstrates digital media skill

    Student Signature

    Parent Signature

● ● ●

Project demonstrates student’s ability
Student encourages others to read the book
Student attracts others and makes them interested in the work

Date

Date

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Argument: A logical way of presenting a belief, conclusion, or stance. Effective arguments are supported by reasoning and evidence.

Author: The originator of any written work.

Author’s Purpose: An author’s main reason for writing. A writer’s purpose may be to entertain, to inform, to persuade, to teach a moral lesson, or to reflect on an experience. An author may have more than one purpose for writing.

Autobiography: A written account of an author’s own life.Biography: An account of a person’s life written by another person.

Cause and Effect: Text structure in which the author presents one or more causes and then describes the resulting effects.

CentralMessage(centralidea):Themainideaofafictionaltext;thecentralmessagemaybedirectlystatedor implied.ComparisonandContrast:Textstructureinwhichtheauthorcomparesandcontraststwoormoresimilarevents, topics,

or objects.

Concrete Words and Phrases: Words or phrases used to describe characteristics and/or qualities that can be perceived through the senses.

Conflict: A struggle or clash between opposing characters, forces, or emotions.
Consumer Reports: Publication that provides reviews and comparisons of consumer products and services based on

reporting and results from testing.
Debate: Form of literary conflict demonstrating both sides of an argument.

Description: Text structure that presents a topic, along with the attributes, specifics, or setting information that describes that topic.

Detail: Fact revealed by the author or speaker that supports the attitude or tone in a piece of poetry or prose. In informational texts, details provide information to support the author’s main point.

Dictating: The process of writing down what someone else has said; a way for a parent or teacher to record a child’s ideas when the writing demands surpass the child’s writing skills.

Editorial: Article presenting the opinion of the editors or publishers.

Essay: A short piece of writing which is often written from an author's personal point of view.

Evidence: Supporting information a writer or speaker uses to prove a claim.

Fantasy: Story employing imaginary characters living in fictional settings where the rules of the real world are altered for effect.

Fiction: Imaginative literary works representing invented rather than actual persons, places, and/or events.

Figurative Language: An expression that departs from the accepted literal sense or from the normal order of words; an extension of this definition includes the use of sound for emphasis, including onomatopoeia, alliteration, assonance, and consonance.

Graphic: Pictorial representation of data or ideas using columns, matrices, or other formats.
Informational Texts: Nonfiction texts that contain facts and information; also referred to as expository texts.

Interview: Meeting at which information is gathered by asking questions of a person about an event, experience, or idea.

Journal: Daily record of events.

Literary Nonfiction: Text that conveys factual information. The text may or may not employ a narrative structure and characteristics such as dialogue. Additionally, literary nonfiction may also persuade, inform, explain, describe, or amuse.

Main Idea: The central thought of a nonfiction text.

Narrative: A story about fictional or real events.

Observation: Act of making and recording a measurement.

Opinion Piece: Writing in which a personal opinion is expressed about a topic. As grade levels progress, the writer must support a point of view with reasons and/or information.

Plot: Sequence of events or actions in a short story, novel, or narrative poem.Publisher: Person or company that produces and distributes printed material.Publication Date: The date the material was printed.
Proposal: Collection of plans or assumptions.

Purpose: Specific reason or reasons for writing. Purpose conveys what the readers have to gain by reading the selection; it is also the objective or the goal that the writer wishes to establish.

Reason: The logical support behind an argument.

Report: Detailed account of an occurrence or situation.

Retelling: Recalling the content of what was read or heard.

Plagiarism: Using someone else's words or ideas as your own. Plagiarism involves copying or borrowing someone else’s original ideas.

Problem/Solution:Textstructureinwhichthemainideasareorganizedintotwoparts:Problemandasubsequent solution that responds to the problem, or a question and an answer that responds to the question.

Setting: The time and place in which events in a short story, novel, or narrative poem take place.

Sequence: Text structure in which ideas are grouped on the basis of order or time.

Speech: Written account of formal spoken communication to an audience.

Summary: A condensed version of a larger reading in which a writer uses his or her own words to express the main idea and relevant details of the text.

Text-to-Self Connection: Linking a topic or situation in the story to a personal experience.Text-to-Text Connection: Linking a topic or situation in the story to another book or story.

Text-to-World Connection: Linking a topic or situation in the story to an event that has occurred in the world, environment, or student’s community.

Theme: Central meaning of a literary work. A literary work can have more than one theme.

Tone: Describes the writer’s/speaker’s attitude toward a subject, character, or audience conveyed through the author’s choice of words and details. Tone can be serious, humorous, sarcastic, objective, etc.